More New Zealand Notes

As I flip through my notebook post-New Zealand, a few things stand out, such as:

Best Beer Name: Pernicious Weed by Garage Project

Best Beer Story: Red Zone Enigma by Twisted Hop — The Twisted Hop brewery was located within what is now the infamous “Red Zone” in Christchurch, which meant that a conditioning batch of their Enigma barley wine was necessarily left to mature from February, when the earthquake struck, to August, when the owners were finally allowed in to extract it and bottle it up! I didn’t have a chance to try it, but it is by all accounts very good indeed. (And I heard good news from Twisted Hop, too! Seems they’ll be reopening in not just one, but as many as three locations in Christchurch.)

Most Ridiculous Idea (That Actually Worked): The madmen behind Yeastie Boys thought it would be a wise idea to brew a beer with 100% peated malt, thus producing Rex Attitude, which strikes me as what Ardbeg might make if it were a brewery rather than a distillery. If that wasn’t foolishness enough, they then decided to up the alcohol content to 10% in an even bigger, peatier beer, Rex, which oddly enough seems more balanced and approachable than the 7% original.

Best Use of Non-Hop Local Ingredients: The Captain Cooker Manuka Beer from the Mussel Inn is flavoured with tips plucked from the manuka tree. The result is one of the most intriguing spice characters I have ever encountered in a beer.

Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time: Arrow Brewing’s Hop in a Bottle, which, yes, actually contains a whole hop cone. One which flakes apart when the bottle is even slightly agitated, leaving significant flotsam floating in your glass.

Best Marketing Slogan: Moa Brewing’s “Dark and acceptable to all palates. The Will Smith of beers.”

3 Comments

Filed under beer & travel, beer advertising, beer industry, beer reviews, beer terminology, hops

3 responses to “More New Zealand Notes

  1. Al

    That Moa brewing slogan is fantastic. Right up there with a Becks ad that I saw in Glasgow. “You don’t have to have to be Posh to swallow Becks.”

  2. sleepingsamuraimediaM

    and then there are things like this:

    and this

    and this:

  3. I had a chance to tour some of the NZ hop yards last winter as part of an agricultural scholarship and was also impressed.

    I was surprised that the famous NZ Organic hops come from only 2 farms. The growers were committed to Organic practices but they weren’t exclusively Organic.

    With only 1% of world hop yields coming from NZ they certainly have some room to grow.

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